Restorative Yoga Pose Viparita Karani with the support of one blanket

Restorative Yoga Sequence: Deep Relaxation with a Single Blanket

Leah Sugerman, E-RYT 500, YACEP
Updated: 
September 08, 2021

Most restorative yoga practices require lots and lots of props, which can be tricky to manage when you’re trying to practice at home. But for this soothing restorative yoga sequence, all you need is a blanket to surrender into deep relaxation.

Yes, that’s correct. You only need ONE prop. And not just any prop, a standard household item—a blanket! 

How to Relax into a Soothing Restorative Yoga Sequence with One Blanket

Grab your favorite yoga blanket or a thick household blanket and get ready to melt into a state of deep rest and rejuvenation with this gentle restorative yoga sequence.

Seated Meditation

practicing a seated meditation with the support of a blanket for extra comfort

Start your restorative yoga sequence with a few moments of silent meditation.

  1. Hold your blanket by its short edges and fold it in half from there. Fold it in half two more times from its short edges until you have a neat rectangle. This is your foundational blanket fold.  

  2. From your foundational fold, fold your blanket in half one more time so that it’s a thick rectangle and place it in the center of your mat.

  3. Come to sit on your blanket in a comfortable cross-legged position of your choice.

  4. Elongate your spine by relaxing your sitting bones down into your blanket as you simultaneously lengthen the crown of your head toward the sky.

  5. Soften your shoulders and relax the weight of your knees toward the floor.

  6. Either look down toward the floor or close your eyes completely.

  7. Draw your attention inward as you start to deepen your breath.

  8. Stay here for a few minutes as you prepare your body for deep relaxation.

Mermaid Twist

Restorative Twist pose supported by one blanket

Add a gentle spinal twist to your practice as you soften your body toward the floor.

  1. Return back to your foundational fold and then roll your blanket’s longer edge up into a tight, thick log roll.

  2. Place it at the back of your mat so that the long edge of your blanket roll is parallel with the long edge of your mat.

  3. Come to sit in front of your blanket roll with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor.

  4. Release both of your knees toward the right side of your mat and take your right hand behind your right hip and draw your left hand to your right knee. 

  5. Inhale and lengthen your spine.

  6. Exhale and spiral your torso toward the right. 

  7. Slowly release the weight of your torso toward the floor to rest onto your blanket roll. 

  8. Turn your head in any direction that feels comfortable for your neck and relax your arms into any soothing position. 

  9. Hold for about 5 to 10 minutes before slowly releasing and twisting to the other side.

Supported Fish Pose (Salamba Matsyasana)

Supported Fish Pose also known as Restorative Matsyasana with only one blanket for a prop

Gently open your heart with this blanket-supported variation of Fish Pose.

  1. Keep your blanket roll as it is at the back of your mat. Return to sit in front of it with the back of your pelvis touching the blanket roll.

  2. Bend your knees and plant your feet on the floor. Walk your feet out as wide as your mat and knock your knees in toward each other.

  3. Walk your hands back behind you and slowly lower your spine onto your blanket roll.

  4. Either keep your legs as they are or stretch them forward in front of you.

  5. Choose the arm placement that’s most comfortable for you. Rest your arms by your sides, open them out wide into a T shape, or stretch them overhead and perhaps hold on to opposite elbows.

  6. Sink the weight of your body into your blanket and surrender into this gentle backbend for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Captured Butterfly (Supta Baddha Konasana)

Variation of Restorative Supta Baddha Konasana or Captured Butterfly Pose

Subtly release your hips into deep relaxation with this blanket-supported version of Captured Butterfly.

  1. Bring your blanket back into its foundational fold and then open it up once so that you have a wide rectangle.

  2. From the long edge, roll your blanket up into a thinner log roll.

  3. Draw the soles of your feet to touch and open your knees out wide toward the sides of your mat.

  4. Place your blanket roll over the tops of your feet and grab the remaining edges of the roll and slide them underneath your calves and thighs.

  5. Slowly release onto your back and draw your heels in closely toward your pelvis to allow your blanket to support your legs. 

  6. Surrender here for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Supported Relaxation Pose (Savasana)

Savasana or Corpse Pose also known as Relaxation Pose with the support of one blanket or one prop

Finish off your restorative yoga sequence with a supported version of Savasana. 

  1. Return back to your foundational fold and then roll your blanket’s longer edge up into a tight, thick log roll.

  2. Stretch your legs forward in front of you, about as wide as your mat, and slide your blanket roll underneath your knees.

  3. Slowly lower onto your back and release your arms by your sides with your palms facing up.

  4. Release the weight of your body into the floor and soften your legs over your blanket.

  5. Soften your gaze or close your eyes and melt into your final resting pose for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Use This Restorative Yoga Sequence to Find Deep Relaxation Anytime, Anywhere

All you need is a blanket for this soothing restorative yoga sequence, which means you can practice this anywhere—from the yoga studio to your house or even in a hotel room. 

You have no excuses to skip out on this relaxing restorative yoga sequence and so much to gain from it. So there’s just no reason not to practice!

 

Chrys Kub yoga teacher and YogaUOnline presenter and movement specialist

 

Leah SugermanLeah Sugerman is a yoga teacher, writer, and passionate world traveler. An eternally grateful student, she has trained in countless schools and traditions of the practice. She teaches a fusion of the styles she has studied with a strong emphasis on breath, alignment, and anatomical integrity. Leah teaches workshops, retreats, and trainings, both internationally and online. For more information, visit www.leahsugerman.com.